Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Publication

Comparison of Sensory Integrative Therapy (specifically weighted vests) and Applied Behavioral Analysis (specifically a differential schedule of reinforcement) in the treatment of children who have Autism Spectrum Disorder

Ellis-Hervey, Nina
Abstract
Scope and Method of Study:
Alternating treatments design was utilized and each student received both of the treatments on alternating days.
Findings and Conclusions:
For many years several different treatments have been utilized, and not all have empirical support. Applied Behavioral Analysis is a treatment shown to improve some of the problematic behaviors displayed by children with autism, which is likely the reason for its widespread use. On the other hand, Sensory Integrative Therapy, specifically the use of weighted vests to eliminate stereotyped behaviors, is also used for this very population; however, there is not enough research in support of it to evaluate its effectiveness. The present study tested the efficacy of such treatments and sought to determine how effective they are in treating those who have autism. Participants included 4 elementary school students who have been diagnosed with autism and display a class of stereotyped behaviors consistent with the diagnosis. These behaviors included body-rocking, hand and limb flapping, repetitive verbalizations, repeated actions, spinning objects and self-injurious behaviors. Alternating treatments design was utilized and each student received both of the treatments on alternating days. The findings and implications of this study suggest that though there are limitations to both treatments, Applied Behavioral Analysis was the most effective across participants.
Date
2011-07