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Evaluation of an antibiotic alternative (Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Fermentation Product; SCFP) on animal performance, plasma metabolites, rumen parameters, and fecal pathogen shedding in feedlot steers

Gong, Xiangwang
Abstract
The objective of this experiment was to evaluate a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (SCFP) on performance, plasma metabolites, rumen parameters, and fecal pathogen shedding in feedlot steers. Crossbred steers (n = 61; 271 ± 48.1 kg) were assigned to 1 of 3 experimental treatments in a randomized complete block design and housed in pens equipped with an automated individual feed intake system. Treatments consisted of a positive control diet with monensin sodium (CON), CON with tylosin phosphate (TYL), or CON with SCFP (SCFP). Body weight and G:F did not differ among treatments (P ≥ 0.12). However, steers fed SCFP tended to have greater ADG from d 35 to 56 (P = 0.10). Additionally, steers fed SCFP had increased DMI from d 56 to 112 and overall (P ≤ 0.05), and a tendency for increased DMI from d 112 to final (P = 0.07). Rumen pH and rumen lactate concentrations were impacted by time (P < 0.01). A treatment × time interaction (P < 0.01) was detected for fecal pH and fecal pH change. Fecal pH was greater in TYL fed steers on d 56 and in CON fed steers on the final day. For fecal pH change, steers that consumed CON had (P < 0.01) or SCFP tended to have (P = 0.08) greater reductions from d 35 to 56, while both CON and SCFP fed steers had greater increases from d 56 to 112 (P < 0.01). Blood plasma metabolite concentrations were impacted by time (P ≤ 0.04). A treatment × time interaction was observed (P < 0.02) for the quantification of stx2 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in fecal samples where SCFP and TYL fed steers tended to have increased levels on d 14, while on d 190 CON and SCFP fed steers had increased levels. Both STEC and Salmonella shedding were impacted by time (P < 0.001). This experiment suggests that SCFP could potentially serve as an alternative to tylosin phosphate in feedlot steers without adversely affecting steer performance. However, notably, CON fed steers performed similarly to steers fed both SCFP and TYL.
Date
2023-12
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