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Publication

Longitudinal Examination of the Parent-Child Distress Relationship in Children With Juvenile Rheumatic Disease

Ryan, Jamie Lynn
Abstract
The objective of the current study was to examine the longitudinal relationships between parent and child distress in a sample of children with juvenile rheumatic diseases (JRDs). A cross-lagged panel correlation analysis tested the temporal precedence of parent distress vs. child distress over a one-year period. Thirty-seven children (ages 9-17; 22 males) diagnosed with JRD and their parents completed self-report measures on two occasions (assessment interval M = 12 months). Primary outcome measures included the Child Depression Inventory (CDI) and Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI). Findings and Conclusions: Significant cross-sectional parent-child distress associations were observed at both time points. Moreover, Time 1 parent distress predicted child distress at Time 2 after child-reported functional ability was controlled; Time 1 child distress was unrelated to Time 2 parent distress. Cross-lagged panel correlations demonstrated the temporal precedence of parent distress relative to child distress in the parent-child distress relationship. These preliminary findings underscore the importance of parent distress in parent-child transactional adjustment, and suggest a predominant role for parent distress in children's adjustment to juvenile rheumatic diseases.
Date
2010-07-01
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