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Publication

Marijuana use among college students: Personality traits, motives, and consequences

Sims, Laney
Abstract
Oklahoma has recently seen an increase in marijuana legalization which likely has influenced the increase in use (NIDA, 2023). The prevalence of marijuana use among college students in the state has raised significant concerns, especially given the state's ranking as 10th nationally for past-year marijuana use among adults 18 and older (SAMHSA, 2023). This study aimed to investigate the relationships among personality traits, motives for use, and adverse consequences associated with marijuana use among college students at Oklahoma State University (OSU). 116 participants were recruited through a SONA system which granted them course credit upon completion. They completed an online survey assessing various factors, including frequency of marijuana use, possession of a medical marijuana card, motives for use, personality traits (i.e. Big-5, Sensation Seeking), and adverse consequences using validated questionnaires. Results revealed a high prevalence of marijuana use among the sample, with over half reporting use multiple times per week. Notably, 62.9% of participants met criteria for Cannabis Use Disorder (CUD) based on CAGE-AID scores, indicating a substantial risk among college students. Motives for use, such as managing effects and facilitating activity, were significantly correlated with adverse consequences and CUD risk. Personality traits, particularly sensation-seeking and neuroticism, were also associated with increased CUD risk and adverse consequences. These findings highlight the complex relationship between personality traits, motives for use, and adverse consequences of marijuana use among college students.
Date
4/16/2024